Plant Life: A Brief History

£62.00 £45.50

Plant Life: A Brief History Author: Format: Hardback First Published: Published By: Oxford University Press Pages: 280 Illustrations and other contents: with 167 illustrations ISBN: 9780199362646 Category:

In Plant Life: A Brief History, Biologist Frederick Essig traces how familiar features of modern plants emerged over hundreds of millions of years of evolution. This chronological narrative explores the events that shaped the photosynthetic cells that were eventually able to survive on land. The book begins with the origin of photosynthesis and the rise of cyanobacteria, and concludes with the innovative growth forms of the monocots.

As different groups of photosynthetic organisms are introduced, the book emphasizes adaptations that enabled them to gain dominance in existing habitats and provides a broad view of why certain plant groups adapted successfully. Essig examines hypothetical scenarios regarding the evolution of flowering plants and tests them with every emerging discovery. Readers will acquire a deeper understanding of the diverse organisms humans depend upon for food, oxygen, medicine, building materials, and aesthetic pleasure.

Weight0.7 kg
[T]hroughout, Plant Life is suffused with much of educational value for sharing with one's students * Nigel Chaffey, Annals of Botany Blog * An approachable and evolutionary-based initiation to general plant biological topics... Recommended. * A. L. Jacobsen, CHOICE * This wonderful little book assays plant diversity. It is the publication I suspect we all thought we would write when we taught our first course on plant diversity. After reading Plant Life I wished that I still taught a course on plant diversity, for this would be my textbook, given its clarity, simplicity, and elegance. * Larry Hufford, The Quarterly Review of Biology *

Author Biography

Frederick B. Essig is an Associate Professor Emeritus of Biology at the University of South Florida. His career has included basic research on the systematics of palms and Clematis, service as Director of the USF Botanical Garden, and the teaching of biological diversity and botany. His work has taken him to Papua New Guinea, Australia, South Africa and tropical America. His most recent research publications include A systematic histological analysis of palm fruits. VIII. The Dypsidinae (Arecaceae) (Brittonia, 2008).