Octopus, Squid & Cuttlefish: A Visual, Scientific Guide to the Ocean’s Most Advanced Invertebrates

£25.00

Octopus, Squid & Cuttlefish: A Visual, Scientific Guide to the Ocean’s Most Advanced Invertebrates Author: Format: Hardback First Published: Published By: The The Ivy Press Pages: 224 Illustrations and other contents: Full colour throughout ISBN: 9781782405702 Categories: , ,

A treasure trove of scientific fact and visual explanation offers a comprehensive review of these fascinating and mysterious marine invertebrates. There are over 700 species of cephalopod, and their existence proofs that intelligence develops in very different ways-it is not by accident that these creatures are favourite models for science fiction and fantasy. While whale brains look somewhat similar to ours, cephalopods carry a large percentage of their brains in their arms. They are capable of learning, and of retaining information. They have eyes and other senses rivalling those of humans, they change texture and body shape, and they change colour faster than a chameleon. From the lone, inky hunting of the octopus, to the social squid, and the unusually large brained cuttlefish, Octopus, Squid, & Cuttlefish reveals the evolution, anatomy, life history, behaviours, and relationships of these spellbinding creatures.

Weight0.9 kg

Author Biography

Dr Roger Hanlon PhD is the Senior Scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole Massachussetts and Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Brown University. As co-author of Cephalopod Behaviour (CUP, 2nd ed. 2016) and 215 peer-reviewed papers on cephalopods, he is a world-renowned expert on his subject. Dr Louise Allcock is a lecturer in Zoology at NUI Galway and President of the Cephalopod International Advisory Council, as well as co-ordinator of the IUCN red data list for cephalopoda. Dr Mike Vecchione is Director of the NOAA Fisheries National Systematics Laboratory and adjunct faculty member at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. He is expert on evolutionary relationships among living squid, cuttlefish, octopods, and their relatives.