Tapping the Oceans: Seawater Desalination and the Political Ecology of Water

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Tapping the Oceans: Seawater Desalination and the Political Ecology of Water Editors: Erik Swyngedouw, Joe Williams Format: Hardback First Published: Published By: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd Language: English ISBN: 9781788113809 Category:

Tapping the Oceans provides a detailed analysis of the political and ecological debates facing water desalination in the twenty-first century. Water supplies for cities around the world are undergoing profound geographical, technological and political transformations. Increasingly, water-stressed cities are looking to the oceans to fix unreliable, contested and over-burdened water supply systems. Yet the use of emerging desalination technologies is accompanied by intense debates on their economic cost, governance, environmental impact and poses wider questions for the sustainable and just provision of urban water. Through a series of cutting-edge case studies and multi-subject approaches, this book explores the perspectives, disputes and politics surrounding water desalination on a broad geographical scale. As the first book of its kind, this unique work will appeal to those researching water and infrastructure issues in the fields of political ecology, geography, environmental science and sustainability. Industry and water managers who wish to understand the political debates around desalination technology more fully will also find this an informative read. Contributors include: E. Feitelson, M. Fragkou, S. Gorostiza, A. Loftus, H. March, J. McEvoy, D. Pavon Gamero, D. Sauri, A. Scheba, S. Scheba, E. Swyngedouw, M. Usher, J. Williams

Weight0.401544 kg

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'This very timely book provides an excellent and insightful introduction to the entanglements of water, salt, power, and capital in the emergence of an alleged environmentally friendly and cornucopian solution to increasing water scarcity. It helps decipher how desalination is fast becoming the last frontier of capital accumulation for both the water industry and financiers, and how it reconfigures existing socio-ecologies in profound and subtle ways.' --Francois Molle, Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement (IRD), France