Microbiomes of Soils, Plants and Animals: An Integrated Approach

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Microbiomes of Soils, Plants and Animals: An Integrated Approach Editors: Rachael E. Antwis, Michael J. Cox, Xavier Harrison Format: Hardback First Published: Published By: Cambridge University Press Pages: 248 Illustrations and other contents: Worked examples or Exercises; 5 Halftones, black and white; Worked examples or Exercises; 5 Halftones, black and white Language: English ISBN: 9781108473712 Categories: , , , ,

Through a long history of co-evolution, multicellular organisms form a complex of host cells plus many associated microorganism species. Consisting of algae, bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and viruses, and collectively referred to as the microbiome, these microorganisms contribute to a range of important functions in their hosts, from nutrition, to behaviour and disease susceptibility. In this book, a diverse and international group of active researchers outline how multicellular organisms have become reliant on their microbiomes to function, and explore this vital interdependence across the breadth of soil, plant, animal and human hosts. They draw parallels and contrasts across hosts in different environments, and discuss how this invisible microbial ecosystem influences everything from the food we eat, to our health, to the correct functioning of ecosystems we depend on. This insightful read also pertinently encourages students and researchers in microbial ecology, ecology, and microbiology to consider how this interdependence may be key to mitigating environmental changes and developing microbial biotechnology to improve life on Earth.

Weight0.66 kg

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'This book focuses on current research investigations of the microbiomes found in animals, plants, and soils. The authors propose an emerging theoretical framework for investigating the complex interactions between microbiomes and their habitats. They promote advancements for studying microbiomes and microorganisms in situ, or in the natural environment, rather than focusing on classical methods using in vitro studies as conducted in labs. Each chapter reveals the significant roles that microbiomes play in biogeochemical cycling and in homeostatic mechanisms of host organisms and natural environments. Also discussed are the impacts of anthropogenic changes on microbiome interactions. Topics in the book include background information on microbiomes, analytical methods for studying them, a review of microbiome research investigations, and biotechnology applications of microbiome research. Each chapter provides a wealth of primary references. As an added plus, the readability level is appropriate for those lacking an extensive background in science.' B. R. Shmaefsky, Choice

Author Biography

Rachael E. Antwis is a microbial ecologist at the University of Salford. Her research encompasses a range of host systems, including soil, plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. She is the founder and co-secretary of the British Ecological Society's Microbial Ecology Special Interest Group, together with Dr Xavier Harrison. Xavier A. Harrison is a molecular ecologist at the University of Exeter. He is fascinated by the potential of host-associated microbes to drive variation among individuals in life history trajectory. He is co-founder of the British Ecological Society's Microbial Ecology Special Interest Group, alongside Rachael Antwis. Michael J. Cox is a microbial ecologist at the University of Birmingham. His expertise is in applying microbial ecology techniques to understand the respiratory microbiome in chronic and acute respiratory diseases. He is an editor at FEMS Microbiology Letters and author of The Lung Microbiome (2019), a monograph for the European Respiratory Society.